Research Standards

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Research Standards

Postby JohnWick » Mon Aug 11, 2008 3:46 pm

This is a brief introduction on the standards we expect at the Shanri Research Institute. Please follow these guidelines for the best chance of having your research verified.

Cite Your Sources
This is the most important step. If you look through the introduction of the core book, you'll see all the sources I used. I'll give you an example of the kind of citation I'm looking for.

For example, let's look at Marcus Fledderjohn's Virtues: The Complete Yvarai Text.


The Fledderjohn Text
was translated from primary documents. The work is very old, held at the Institute, and available for viewing by special permission.

Virtues was a very important book to the ven. It presented moral and ethical dilemmas in the form of plays. Different versions of Virtues contained different versions of the plays, or in some cases, different plays all together. Each House kept its own version--each claiming it had the definitive version, of course--with alternate interpretations of the plays. The Burghe Version emphasized Strength, the Steele Version emphasized Cunning, etc, the Mwrr Version emphasized Wisdom, etc.

The Fledderjohn Text is one of the only complete copies of Virtues we have. It is also the only version translated directly from the original ven. Other texts exist, but are less trustworthy, less complete.


This is one of the sources I listed in the main book. Before we start using sources, new members should give a detailed account of their own sources for approval by the Institute. Some texts are more and less reliable than others. We just want to make sure we're using the best possible sources and identify poorer sources so we can give the material the proper scrutiny.

Findings
After your sources have been approved by the Institute, you are free to list findings in those sources. Again, the Institute will review all research and make comments (and corrections) where necessary. While the Institute does maintain the final voice of authority on all matters regarding Shanri and the ven, we are open to different interpretations of text. We can be wrong. and there are cases where multiple interpretations are be valid--even if they contradict each other.

If you have any questions regarding research, please post them here. One question per post, please!
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Re: Research Standards

Postby King Turnip » Wed Aug 13, 2008 12:45 pm

A source I dug up, translated from the original German. While it is seriously flawed in it's understanding of the Ven, it may provide a window into the people who researched the Ven during one of the most fruitful periods of Ven scholarship.

The Ven in the Stanzas of Dyzan, by Gottfried Langholtz

This text from the late 19th century represents an important milestone in Ven research, though it has been largely surpassed by modern scholarship. Even before the Damascus find, the research by Professor Langholtz was proven to be erronious in many ways.

Langholtz posited frequent contact and trade between the Ven and other cultures then believed to be contemporaneous, such as the Atlanteans, the Mu, and most importantly the early Cimmerians. The Stanzas mention the Ven only briefly, and the text which Langholtz based his findings was questionable. Further evidence for Langholtz's theory was the unusual frequency of native iron and iron ore deposits found in and near Ven archeology sites-- by which he concluded that the Ven were in possession of Cimmerian steel. As more Ven sites have been discovered, the supposed correlation between the Ven and iron appears to have been completely illusory, an artifact of the small number of finds at that time.

While the research of The Ven in the Stanzas of Dyzan is seriously flawed by our modern standards, it remains an important work in the field. Bouyed by the popularity of the work, intrest in the Ven by European gentry became quite the rage through the last three decades of the 19th century. With noble patronage, Langholtz founded the Institut zur Erforschung der venischen Kultur und Geschichte in 1866, which would become a focal point for Ven scholarship until closed by direct order of Kaiser Wilhelm II in 1915.

The Venische Institut provided us with many of the classics in Ven scholarship. The Ven in the Stanzas of Dyzan provided the spark to light that fire. Further, understanding the influence of Gottfried Langholtz on the proceedings of that body may help to recognize the errors in otherwise stellar research conducted there in it's final years.
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Re: Research Standards

Postby ElectricPaladin » Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:43 am

I am pleased to report the discovery of a new primary source!

Until just this month, The Book of Bitterness, attributed (probably falsely) to the spuriously prolific Isawr Q'n, existed only as a handful of scattered documents. A week ago in Indiana I was lucky enough to acquire what seems to be a complete text. Of course, the San Francisco State University's Department of Antediluvian Studies is currently occupied with ascertaining the text's authenticity. I will be able to report more when San Francisco Sate University has sent its findings to the Shanri Research Institute and had them approved. Of course, I will then have the entire text sent to the Institute and maintain only a facsimile for my own use.

The Book of Bitterness is a combination cookbook and diary, full of recipes and anecdotes. Of course, being a work of the Ven, it contains as many recipes for food as it does poisons, as we learned two years ago when Professor Andrew Shultz attempted to recreate the "Wasp's Delicate Kiss" recipe from the Copenhagen Fragment and rendered himself comatose. To this day, we still do not know if it was substituting modern ingredients that did Professor Schultz in or if his demise was the intent of the recipe.

Nevertheless, if this primary source proves authentic, it will be a tremendous leap forward in Ven studies. In addition to giving us a clearer idea of what the Ven ate and drank and their attitudes towards food, material in The Book of Bitterness can be extrapolated to provide information about flora and fauna in Shanri and the Ven relationship to it; what the Ven considered edible, and what they did not. Of course, Isawr Q'n's narratives will also give us yet another window into Ven culture, or at least how they imagined their culture.

I look forward to this text's authentication so that we can begin mining it for gems!
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Re: Research Standards

Postby JohnWick » Mon Aug 25, 2008 12:04 pm

King Turnip wrote:The Ven in the Stanzas of Dyzan, by Gottfried Langholtz


Approved.
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Re: Research Standards

Postby JohnWick » Mon Aug 25, 2008 12:05 pm

ElectricPaladin wrote:The Book of Bitterness


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Re: Research Standards

Postby gains » Sun Sep 21, 2008 3:55 pm

The Shared Poison a recently uncovered ven opera score

It may be the very fact that this work was suppressed in its own time that allowed us to find it. Hidden so well by its owner that it was the only whole artifact uncovered in the recent digs at ___. This appears to be the composer's original score, considering the many edits and revisions made within the manuscript, sadly unsigned. Included with the score are some notes on the performance in another unsigned hand. Those notes describe how the opera was banned after opening night in the halls of Duke Almyyr for "scandalous content."

Even considering the excellent condition of this find the age of the vellum and the dialect used have made translation of the libretto difficult. As the text is deciphered I hope to be able to provide a synopsis of the opera's plot and characters. If the institute's reconstruction of ven musical notation is sufficient to the task I may even be able to provide a transcription.

Provided the institute sees fit to support my efforts, of course.
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Re: Research Standards

Postby JohnWick » Sun Sep 21, 2008 4:47 pm

gains wrote:The Shared Poison a recently uncovered ven opera score

It may be the very fact that this work was suppressed in its own time that allowed us to find it. Hidden so well by its owner that it was the only whole artifact uncovered in the recent digs at ___. This appears to be the composer's original score, considering the many edits and revisions made within the manuscript, sadly unsigned. Included with the score are some notes on the performance in another unsigned hand. Those notes describe how the opera was banned after opening night in the halls of Duke Almyyr for "scandalous content."

Even considering the excellent condition of this find the age of the vellum and the dialect used have made translation of the libretto difficult. As the text is deciphered I hope to be able to provide a synopsis of the opera's plot and characters. If the institute's reconstruction of ven musical notation is sufficient to the task I may even be able to provide a transcription.

Provided the institute sees fit to support my efforts, of course.


Approved by the Shanri Research Institute.
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Re: Research Standards

Postby roc » Thu Jan 15, 2009 1:59 pm

The War on the White, an uncovered Diary: Unknown

The diary was uncovered in an underground tomb in Egypt nearly half a decade ago, and it has taken this long to ensure it was preserved enough to move and begin deciphering. So far only the title of this diary and the first entry have been restored enough to translate and read.

"Today I met with The Senate [this is a rough translation, it could also mean "the ones in power" or "those in control"], and during the meeting the subject consisted of those who sleep [RT "are dead" or "unwaking"], allow the young power beyond that of their years, and what to do with them. It was decided that they must be removed and forgotten [RT "Destroyed" or "Eliminated"], and for this task, I was chosen.
I am pleased that they decided to start with, The Ruthless Serpent, and are allowing me to lead the charge to end her. None would be better suited to the task then one who once served [RT "Was a pawn to" or "Owed my life to"] her."
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Re: Research Standards

Postby JohnWick » Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:03 am

roc wrote:The War on the White, an uncovered Diary: Unknown

The diary was uncovered in an underground tomb in Egypt nearly half a decade ago, and it has taken this long to ensure it was preserved enough to move and begin deciphering. So far only the title of this diary and the first entry have been restored enough to translate and read.

"Today I met with The Senate [this is a rough translation, it could also mean "the ones in power" or "those in control"], and during the meeting the subject consisted of those who sleep [RT "are dead" or "unwaking"], allow the young power beyond that of their years, and what to do with them. It was decided that they must be removed and forgotten [RT "Destroyed" or "Eliminated"], and for this task, I was chosen.
I am pleased that they decided to start with, The Ruthless Serpent, and are allowing me to lead the charge to end her. None would be better suited to the task then one who once served [RT "Was a pawn to" or "Owed my life to"] her."


*approved by the Shanri Research Institute*
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Re: Research Standards

Postby BerinKinsman » Sun May 24, 2009 3:08 pm

The Doyle Letters is a leather-bound volume of select personal correspondence Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle conducted with other members of the Spiritualist movement. It is said to contain references to Doyle's research into the ven. The scholarship is suspect, however, as Doyle was seeking knowledge of Spiritualism and not the ven, and thus facts have possibly been skewed to support his own world view. The book is currently in possession of a certain Mr. Albert Bader of Zurich, who refuses to release it to the public claiming that it contains information that would be damaging to the reputation of Sir Arthur and other notable persons of his era. Since the 1970s, however, Bader has released select pages of the volume (although never complete letters) which confirm Doyle's interest in the ven. Among the startling revelations are Doyle's belief that Bram Stoker's seminal novel, Dracula, was largely plagiarized from an obscure piece of ven literature titled The Red Count's Obsession.
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