Adding Details, IC vs. OOC

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Adding Details, IC vs. OOC

Postby Davechan » Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:02 am

To what extent do people have a split between Player and Character knowledge when adding details with wagers? I like the idea of players being able to establish details that their characters don't necessarily know yet. For instance, in the standard "investigating a murder" scenario:

Success: I find a clue
1st Wager: It points towards Lord Bob
2nd Wager: But he has been framed
3rd Wager: By a jealous lover

This obviously lets the player shape the story they want to see, which is great. But, if the character knows from the outset it's a frame-job, it takes some of the fun out of it. For this reason I don't think that a character should necessarily "have access" to all the details their player establishes. I don't think there needs to be any hard-and-fast rule for this, as it will generally be obvious from context which things any given character does know, and which they don't. Just interested to see how other people have handled this in play. (I've yet to actually run a session yet myself)
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Re: Adding Details, IC vs. OOC

Postby Nihilistic Mind » Mon Feb 21, 2011 11:45 am

You are free to establish Truths your character does not know about as usual, using Style, Privilege or Wagers; you can then choose to state whether or not your character knows theses Truths (some of them or all of them) without spending a Wager or Style.
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Re: Adding Details, IC vs. OOC

Postby LordWyrmsBane » Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:47 pm

This can be a big problem as well though. There are two things to look out for.

First, if you do not have players who can tell the difference between IC information and OOC information, they might act on information they cannot have. Be sure to define who knows the information, and how they obtained it. If a character acts on information they should not have, make them spend Style and define how they got this information. You can then always deny the Style expenditure if you don't think their methods would have worked, or if you don't want them using that information yet.

The second problem to look out for is the player whose character 'knows everything'. This can be a real problem, if they are willing to spend Style and wagers to know every little fact, and then use that information to their advantage. Use the same methods above to keep them in check (or recruit your players to help you out).

An example of this occurred recently in my game. A player used a wager to state that he held a Blood Contract with an enemy Count. Another player (playing a Snake), spent a Style point to declare that he knew the details of this Contract. He wanted to use the terms of the Contract to take advantage of the other player. However, the first player spent 2 Style to deny the truth, and followed it up with another Style to state that only he knew the contents of the Contract. I allowed it to stand that only the first player knew the details of the Contract.

Of course, I then rewarded the Snake for his efforts by giving him the three Style which were spent to deny his original truth. :twisted:
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Re: Adding Details, IC vs. OOC

Postby wunderworks » Thu Apr 07, 2011 2:09 pm

LordWyrmsBane wrote:This can be a big problem as well though. There are two things to look out for.

First, if you do not have players who can tell the difference between IC information and OOC information, they might act on information they cannot have. Be sure to define who knows the information, and how they obtained it. If a character acts on information they should not have, make them spend Style and define how they got this information. You can then always deny the Style expenditure if you don't think their methods would have worked, or if you don't want them using that information yet.

The second problem to look out for is the player whose character 'knows everything'. This can be a real problem, if they are willing to spend Style and wagers to know every little fact, and then use that information to their advantage. Use the same methods above to keep them in check (or recruit your players to help you out).

An example of this occurred recently in my game. A player used a wager to state that he held a Blood Contract with an enemy Count. Another player (playing a Snake), spent a Style point to declare that he knew the details of this Contract. He wanted to use the terms of the Contract to take advantage of the other player. However, the first player spent 2 Style to deny the truth, and followed it up with another Style to state that only he knew the contents of the Contract. I allowed it to stand that only the first player knew the details of the Contract.

Of course, I then rewarded the Snake for his efforts by giving him the three Style which were spent to deny his original truth. :twisted:


Trust your players, and you won't have to worry about the IC/OOC information divide being abused. :D
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Re: Adding Details, IC vs. OOC

Postby jeffszusz » Tue Apr 26, 2011 12:02 am

"The Character That Seems To Know Everything"

Sounds like the lightning-quick deductions of Sherlock Holmes, or the far-reaching eyes and ears of someone with a rather effective Spy Network.
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